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Thursday, Oct 25 2018

Another First for TAC Air: First Large Chain FBO Network to Achieve IS-BAH Stage 2 Certification

Front Line Services Demonstrate The Execution Of Process To Gain Certification Across the System

Dallas, Texas (October 17, 2018) – TAC Air, a fixed-base operator (FBO) with 14 U.S. locations, has become the first large chain FBO to achieve the rigorous safety and ground handling Stage 2 accreditation from the Internal Business Aviation Council (IBAC). With only 32 FBOs globally certified with Stage 2 IS-BAH registration, TAC Air sets the standard.

The IBAC Stage 1 accreditation, the global business aviation industry’s audit of standards for ground handling, was earned by TAC Air in 2016. Within the required two year period, TAC Air has achieved the International Standard for Business Aircraft Handling (IS-BAH) Stage 2 certificate of registration for all 14 FBO locations.

IS-BAH Program Director for IBAC, Terry Yeomans, shared, "The International Business Aviation Council congratulates TAC Air in achieving IS-BAH Stage 2 registration by demonstrating its implementation of safety management and risk mitigation.”

As the first large chain FBO network to achieve IS-BAH Stage 2 registration in all locations, TAC Air has not only met rigorous aviation industry safety standards, but also proved its practice of safety management and associated activities are appropriately targeted and safety risks effectively managed.

“TAC Air is committed to operating at the highest level of safety and is continually seeking ways to improve its operations. Achievement of Stage 2 IS-BAH certification is confirmation of this commitment,” stated Christian Sasfai, VP and COO of TAC Air.

Certificates of registration are issued by IBAC to FBOs that have successfully demonstrated conformity to the industry's best practice standards through completion of a three-stage external audit by an IBAC accredited auditor.

Photo: At NBAA’s annual convention in Orlando, Terry Yeomans, IBAC’s IS-BAH program coordinator (second from right) presented TAC Air staff including president and CEO Greg Arnold (fourth from right) and TAC Air vice president and COO Christian Sasfai with certificates indicating IS-BAH Stage 2 registration for each of the company’s 14 FBOs.

About TAC AirTAC Air is an aviation ground services company providing the highest level of service available in fixed base operations with more than 700 associates in its network of operations spanning across the U.S. from Salt Lake City in the west to Hartford, CT in the east. TAC Air is a division of TAC - The Arnold Companies, a Texas-based aviation services and energy marketing company.

Find more information about the passion for great service TAC Air is providing pilots, aircraft owners, airlines and government/military at www.tacair.com. For more information about TAC, visit https://thearnoldcos.com.

About IBACIBAC represents the interests of business aviation worldwide. IBAC is a member-supported, non-profit international trade association with permanent observer status at the International Civil Aviation Organization, the UN Specialized Agency for aviation matters, in Montreal, Canada. IBAC promotes and manages the industry-leading standards for best safety practices through its IS-BAO™ and IS-BAH™ Programmes; Safety Management Tool Kit; SMS eLearning training; and Aircrew Identification Card. www.ibac.com.

TAC Air
Monday, Oct 22 2018

TAC Air Becomes First Large FBO Chain To Achieve IS-BAH Stage 2 Registration

TAC Air Earns Chain-wide IS-BAH Stage 2 Registration

by Curt Epstein | October 17, 2018, 10:33 AM

Texas-based TAC Air (Booth 2956) has become the first large FBO chain to achieve Stage 2 registration under the International Standard for Business Aviation Handling (IS-BAH) at all of its bases. 

In 2016, TAC Air earned Stage 1 IS-BAH registration for all 14 of its locations, and it successfully earned the next level in the voluntary safety management system (SMS)-based program of industry best practices, within the specified two years. This week at NBAA 2018, the company was awarded 14 certificates of registration by IBAC, which administers the program.

“The International Business Aviation Council congratulates TAC Air in achieving IS-BAH Stage 2 registration by demonstrating its implementation of safety management and risk mitigation,” said IS-BAH program director Terry Yeomans. The certificates are awarded to locations that have demonstrated conformity to the safety practices as confirmed by a three-stage external audit conducted by an IBAC accredited auditor.

TAC Air is committed to operating at the highest level of safety and is continually seeking ways to improve its operations,” said company vice president and COO Christian Sasfai. “Achievement of Stage 2 IS-BAH certification is confirmation of this commitment.”

At NBAA’s annual convention in Orlando, Terry Yeomans, IBAC’s IS-BAH program coordinator (second from right) presented TAC Air staff including president and CEO Greg Arnold (fourth from right) and TAC Air vice president and COO Christian Sasfai with certificates indicating IS-BAH Stage 2 registration for each of the company’s 14 FBOs.

View original article from AIN online >>

TAC Air
Wednesday, Oct 10 2018

TAC Air - LIT Hosts Military Planes Fleeing Storm

Dozens of military planes fleeing storm stop in, near Little Rock

by Noel Oman | October 10, 2018, 4:30 a.m.

The small orange-and-white, single-engine, two-seat aircraft began arriving in Little Rock one by one shortly after noon Tuesday, among the earliest evacuees of Hurricane Michael. More of the planes arrived later in pairs, breaking formation above Bill and Hillary Clinton National Airport/Adams Field and landing one behind the other. By Tuesday evening, about 50 of the U.S. Navy turboprop trainers were to arrive at Clinton National from Naval Air Station Whiting Field on the Florida Gulf Coast, an area expected to bear the brunt of the coming storm.

"We expect to have a full house," Ron Mathieu, executive director of Arkansas' largest airport, said Tuesday. 

Danny York, line manager for TAC Air at Bill and Hillary Clinton National Airport/Adams Field, checks on a line of T-6 Texan II aircraft Tuesday at the airport. About 50 of the U.S. Navy primary trainers were expected to arrive from Naval Air Station Whiting Field in Florida as Hurricane Michael neared the coast. -Photo by Staton Breidenthal

"The combination of our location and infrastructure makes Little Rock AFB an ideal evacuation point for 1 SOW aircraft," Rininger said. Evacuations during hurricane season are not unusual for the military's multimillion-dollar assets along the Gulf Coast and the military aviators stationed there. The Navy trainer planes are T-6 Texan IIs and cost $7 million apiece. A standard C-130J, the latest model of C-130s, costs about $62 million. A gunship approaches $200 million.

At Clinton National, planning for the Florida planes began Sunday as Charlie Jones, the airport's operations director, monitored the tropical depression off the Yucatan peninsula of Mexico that later developed into Hurricane Michael. Throughout the day, Hurricane Michael strengthened, growing by evening to a Category 3 hurricane, with wind speeds of 120 mph. It is forecast to make landfall midday today. In its path are military airfields scattered along the Gulf Coast, including Naval Air Station Whiting Field, home of the T-6s, and Hurlbert Field. The A-10s and two of the C-130s are from Moody Air Force Base in Georgia near the Florida border. 

"It's a good cross-country stop for them," said Kip Simanek, general manager of TAC Air operations at Clinton National. "It's a tribute to the city's hospitality."

TAC Air is a general-aviation service center that usually caters to business jets and other private aircraft. The company, on the west side of the airport near the general-aviation runway, provides refueling services and a place for crews to rest.

"They always seem to have a good time here in Little Rock and enjoy the city," Simanek said of the training aviators. "They talk about it a lot. The people at the hotels they stay at always seem to enjoy their company while they're there. It seems like a good relationship."

Several military aviators were in the TAC Air facility Tuesday waiting for rental cars or shuttles to hotels. They declined to comment and referred questions to the public affairs office at Whiting Field, where no one could be reached Tuesday afternoon.

The TAC Air personnel had a busy afternoon on Taxiway Poppa helping park the trainer planes, refueling them and making arrangements for payment for the fuel.

"We do put in some overtime to take care of them because it's what I call an IROP, an irregular operation that happens away from what our normal business is," Simanek said. "But the guys and gals I have working for me enjoy providing the support. Everybody is happy to do it. It's kind of a morale booster."

The evacuees also provide an economic boost when they stay in Little Rock, which this time will likely be through Thursday or Friday. "It's good for us, it's good for Little Rock because they're staying at the hotels, they're eating at the restaurants and everything else," Mathieu said.

View original article from the Arkansas Democrat Gazette >>

TAC Air
Tuesday, Oct 9 2018

TACenergy Trader Mark Anderle Quoted by CNBC

US crude dips 5 cents, settling at $74.29, as Chinese stimulus measures shrink early losses

Published 9:14 PM ET Sun, 7 Oct 2018 | Updated 2:35 PM ET Mon, 8 Oct 2018  | ReutersPhoto: Andrew Burton | Getty Images

Oil prices fell on Monday but pared losses along with the U.S. stock market as investors bet that China's economic stimulus steps on Sunday would be sufficient to boost the world's No. 2 economy and bolster its crude demand.

Global benchmark Brent crude slid below $83 per barrel early in the session, partly on concerns the U.S.-China trade war could weaken crude demand in China.

But prices bounced off session lows as investors bet that Sunday's move by China's central bank to slash lenders' reserve requirements would spur economic growth, analysts said.

"Every time China cuts interest rates, they increase oil consumption," said Phil Flynn, an analyst at Price Futures Group in Chicago. "Cooler heads are prevailing."

Oil prices also pared losses after Irving Oil confirmed a "major incident" at Canada's largest refinery in Saint John, New Brunswick following reports of an explosion.

Brent crude hit a session low of $82.66 and then bounced back to trade 43 cents lower at $83.73 per barrel at 2:25 ET. Brent hit a four-year high of $86.74 last week.

U.S. crude ended Monday's session down 5 cents at $74.29, off its session low of $73.07.

Oil traders initially reacted to a selloff in Chinese stocks, but as the U.S. stock market opened higher, "we've pulled back dramatically," said Mark Anderle, an energy trader at TAC Energy.

Also pressuring oil below $83 a barrel in early trade were reports that some Iranian oil exports will keep flowing after the U.S. re-imposes sanctions. Two companies in India have ordered Iranian barrels in November, India's oil minister said on Monday.

Read original article on CNBC.com >>

TACenergy
Friday, Oct 5 2018

TAC Air Opens Doors for Hurricane Relief Efforts

Operation Airdrop Ups Hurricane Relief

September 27, 2018 | By David Tulis

Volunteer aviators with the Texas-based Operation Airdrop nonprofit delivered 280,692 pounds of supplies during 475 general aviation flights after Hurricane Florence swept through the Carolinas.

“Everything started blowing up and got bigger and bigger” as the relief effort for the Category 1 storm unfolded, said Doug Jackson, co-founder of the grassroots charity. The organization burst onto the scene in 2017 following Hurricane Harvey, which pummeled Houston with torrential rains before flooding severed smaller communities from federal disaster relief efforts by road. The Carolinas relief-effort tally exceeded the Texas coast’s estimated 250,000 pounds of goods. Aircraft of various sizes participated in the massive relief effort that Jackson referred to as a freight train of help.

Pilots flying single-engine Beechcraft, Cessna, Cirrus, and Piper aircraft dotted the TAC Air fixed-base operator's ramp at the Raleigh-Durham International Airport. Jackson said that the Joe Gibbs Racing team CRJ-700 staff took a break from shuttling top NASCAR drivers to devote resources to flying relief missions. Pilatus PC–12 and Socata TBM 700 turboprops also hauled heavy loads. 

Photo: Operation Airdrop volunteers coordinated hundreds of general aviation compassion flights from the TAC Air FBO at Raleigh Durham International Airport in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence. Photo courtesy of Operation Airdrop.

Civilian volunteer Zack Medford from the Carolina Cavalry outreach organization said working with the racing team hauling supplies was an “amazing” experience. “Thank you so much, Operation Airdrop, for coming to our aid,” he said on a social media video. “I can’t tell you how much it means seeing all these different private pilots come together and put their time, their resources, and their planes to work to help the people of North Carolina and to the people who live along the coast.”

Volunteers Curtis and Raquel Boyd learned about Operation Airdrop from social media—the organization’s communication backbone. “What little you can do, it just matters,” said Raquel Boyd, a ground-based volunteer who worked for three days dispatching aircraft, answering telephones, and filling in where needed. “It’s a blessing to see the number of people who came out to support Carolinians,” said her husband, Curtis. Operation Airdrop western operations specialist and air traffic controller Brian Kelly posted a video to social media that thanked countless volunteer pilots and ground crew members who “followed with their heart, their labor, and their skill. It was just absolutely amazing what we were able to get done,” said Kelly.

Jackson said planning for the massive relief operation began days before the storm swept ashore, and he complimented the TAC Air FBO for literally “opening their doors to us before they even moved into their new building” on the airfield.

Communication crews were summoned to install telephone lines, the sparkling new floor was striped with red tape to mark delivery loads, and posters were taped to walls to indicate loads, traffic flow, and other logistics. “We expected 10 people to help out, but instead we got 150,” Jackson noted.

“I think the key to our success was the huge pool of talent that we had,” added Jackson. “I don’t know if we’d ever tapped it before. When I started this thing [in 2017] I was thinking we’d get 10 or 15 guys and just have some fun and help people. Every time we went forward, we learned a little. That’s the magical part of this organization. There are such astoundingly talented people working the back end supporting everybody. We really couldn’t do it without them.”

Continue reading via AOPA.org >>

TAC Air
Tuesday, Oct 2 2018

TAC Air - FSM Helps Animals Get Chance at "Fur-ever" Homes

By Jadyn Watson-Fisher / Times Record

Posted Sep 29, 2018 at 12:01 AM / Updated Oct 1, 2018 at 3:04 PM

Big dogs, small dogs, fluffy cats and skinny cats from HOPE Humane Society all caught flights to new states, and some to new homes, this weekend.

Raymond Rivera with TAC Air helps to load more than 70 animals from HOPE Humane Society in Fort Smith onto a “Wings of Rescue” plane at TAC Air-FSM.

[BRIAN D. SANDERFORD/TIMES RECORD]

Wings of Rescue, a nonprofit based in California, transported approximately six dozen animals Friday morning to Idaho, said Humane Society interim director Raina Rodgers. The organization works to “fly shelter pets home,” relieving stress from overcrowded shelters and avoiding euthanization.

Big dogs, small dogs, fluffy cats and skinny cats from HOPE Humane Society all caught flights to new states, and some to new homes, this weekend.

Wings of Rescue, a nonprofit based in California, transported approximately six dozen animals Friday morning to Idaho, said Humane Society interim director Raina Rodgers. The organization works to “fly shelter pets home,” relieving stress from overcrowded shelters and avoiding euthanization.

Rodgers said the Wings of Rescue flight was scheduled for Sept. 21 but was postponed because of the group’s involvement with animal rescues following Hurricane Florence.

“They’re doing this awesome transport for us where they come and get them, they use their crates and then they fly away. Thank goodness,” Rodgers said.

Then on Saturday morning, thanks to about $15,000 in local donations, the Humane Society will send another group of animals to Oregon through the Oklahoma organization, Fetch Fido a Flight. Rodgers said the shelter needed sponsorships for the Fido flight because of the cost of renting a plane, pilot and paying fees to use airport facilities and transporting from one airspace to another.

These flights have been in the works for quite awhile, and despite having the opportunity to send a handful of pets on Fido flights for other shelters in the past, the Humane Society finally gets to participate in two air transports of its own.

“We have been approaching them for a long time,” Rodgers said. “There are a lot of other places that have a population problem, too, so sometimes you just have to wait your turn.”

Animals submitted for transport, 76 for the first flight and 176 for the second, were proven to be in good health, met the receiving shelters’ requirements and many already have adopters. Rodgers said the Humane Society sent photos and videos of the available pets with their information, allowing the receiving organizations to pre-adopt them. Pets who have not been pre-adopted will live with foster families as the shelters work to find permanent homes, Rodgers said.

Rodgers said the shelter does driving transports multiple times a month, but like local adopters, many of their partner shelters want small animals. The flight heading to Oregon, however, featured a large number of pit bulls and pit bull mixes due to the state’s openness toward the breed.

“A lot of other rescues — certain states and cities have certain rules — and unfortunately, in this generation, it’s the pits that have a bad rap,” Rodgers said. “Fortunately, for the Fetch Fido a Flight, they don’t mind pits and pit mixes in Oregon, so we’re getting out as many of those as possible.”

The flights are significant for all Fort Smith residents, Rodgers said. Some people might not notice the animal overpopulation because animal control officers tend to bring them in before they cause too many issues, but it doesn’t negate the situation.

“We have to try to get them taken care of, make sure they’re healthy and get them re-adopted to responsible people, and there are just so many,” Rodgers said. “It’s important for everyone to understand what we’re doing over here and why these flights are so important, so that we’re not all swimming in animals all the time.”

Rodgers said the Humane Society had about 547 dogs and 230 cats in its care about a week ago. The adoption center itself is really the only area that doesn’t have animals covering most of the floor space. These flights will give the shelter some relief as it passes 200 pets to new homes and shelters in need of adoptable animals.

“It’s a really good thing,” Rodgers said. “We’re hoping this will build us relationships that we can use continually, because, unfortunately, our population problem is not going to be solved by a couple of flights. It will be helped, and we’re so grateful, but we could probably do a flight every month.”

Rodgers said the Wings of Rescue flight was scheduled for Sept. 21 but was postponed because of the group’s involvement with animal rescues following Hurricane Florence.

“They’re doing this awesome transport for us where they come and get them, they use their crates and then they fly away. Thank goodness,” Rodgers said.

Then on Saturday morning, thanks to about $15,000 in local donations, the Humane Society will send another group of animals to Oregon through the Oklahoma organization, Fetch Fido a Flight. Rodgers said the shelter needed sponsorships for the Fido flight because of the cost of renting a plane, pilot and paying fees to use airport facilities and transporting from one airspace to another.

These flights have been in the works for quite a while, and despite having the opportunity to send a handful of pets on Fido flights for other shelters in the past, the Humane Society finally gets to participate in two air transports of its own.

“We have been approaching them for a long time,” Rodgers said. “There are a lot of other places that have a population problem, too, so sometimes you just have to wait your turn.”

Animals submitted for transport, 76 for the first flight and 176 for the second, were proven to be in good health, met the receiving shelters’ requirements and many already have adopters. Rodgers said the Humane Society sent photos and videos of the available pets with their information, allowing the receiving organizations to pre-adopt them. Pets who have not been pre-adopted will live with foster families as the shelters work to find permanent homes, Rodgers said.

Rodgers said the shelter does driving transports multiple times a month, but like local adopters, many of their partner shelters want small animals. The flight heading to Oregon, however, featured a large number of pit bulls and pit bull mixes due to the state’s openness toward the breed.

“A lot of other rescues — certain states and cities have certain rules — and unfortunately, in this generation, it’s the pits that have a bad rap,” Rodgers said. “Fortunately, for the Fetch Fido a Flight, they don’t mind pits and pit mixes in Oregon, so we’re getting out as many of those as possible.”

The flights are significant for all Fort Smith residents, Rodgers said. Some people might not notice the animal overpopulation because animal control officers tend to bring them in before they cause too many issues, but it doesn’t negate the situation.

“We have to try to get them taken care of, make sure they’re healthy and get them re-adopted to responsible people, and there are just so many,” Rodgers said. “It’s important for everyone to understand what we’re doing over here and why these flights are so important, so that we’re not all swimming in animals all the time.”

Rodgers said the Humane Society had about 547 dogs and 230 cats in its care about a week ago. The adoption center itself is really the only area that doesn’t have animals covering most of the floor space. These flights will give the shelter some relief as it passes 200 pets to new homes and shelters in need of adoptable animals.

“It’s a really good thing,” Rodgers said. “We’re hoping this will build us relationships that we can use continually, because, unfortunately, our population problem is not going to be solved by a couple of flights. It will be helped, and we’re so grateful, but we could probably do a flight every month.”

TAC Air
Monday, Oct 1 2018

A Big TAC Air Thank You

The following message was sent to TAC Air on September 24, 2018:

Dear TAC Air Corporate HQ,

I am a local RDU customer who flies a lot. In fact, I just went through TAC Air at BDL on a recent trip. Every FBO I visit has a personality. Some clearly don't like their jobs and some have a smile. 

"TAC Air-RDU has a special quality. The staff there has heart and cares about their customers and community. You can't train that and a policy manual can't teach that."

This past week at RDU was nuts. Emergency relief flights to help North Carolina residents impacted by Hurricane Florence originated out of the TAC Air under-renovation building at RDU. Daniel Mansfield and his team did everything they possibly could to assist with relief efforts and aviation activities. It was all done with a smile and all hands were on deck.

On the first day of flight operations, Daniel in his white shirt and tie was the one marshaling me in for supply loading. Daryl, who runs the maintenance services area, was manning the exit door for relief pilots at one point. It was all hands on deck.

According to Operation Airdrop, there were 517 relief flights out of RDU carrying 280,000 pounds of cargo with 468 volunteer pilots. 

"It was the most organized chaos I've ever seen, but every person at TAC Air stepped up and delivered services with care and skill."

Your amazing team at TAC Air-RDU even managed to rescue me when I blew a tire on landing back at RDU for another load of relief supplies.

I'm not a Jet A customer. I'm a small fry. But if your RDU team will take this much care with me, then you know the bigger aircraft are getting great care, as well. To repay the love, I always attempt to refuel back at RDU.

Flying relief supplies into hard-hit areas from the storm was exhausting. But TAC Air-RDU and corporate TAC Air played a big part in assisting a lot of people on their worst day.

Thank you for making me so proud of TAC Air-RDU. They truly are part of my aviation family and words can't describe how exceptional they all were at this time of need. I'd name people personally but it would be the whole roster.

--

Steve Rhode - PilotThe Nonprofit Pilot.dog Foundation

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